Tag: Vegan

Pamela Anderson asks Trudeau to serve inmates vegan meals to save cash

image host

Actress Pamela Anderson is asking Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to take meat and milk off prison menus to help the planet and the health of federal inmates — and save taxpayers some cash, to boot.

The former Baywatch star makes the pitch in a letter to Trudeau part of her work with the animal-rights group PETA, writing that she hopes Canada embraces what she calls a “simple but effective way to reduce costs and improve lives.”

She wants Canada’s federal penitentiaries to serve vegan meals of beans, rice, lentils, pasta, vegetables and fruits, which she bills as sources of all the nutrients one would need, “at a fraction of the cost of meats and cheeses,” since most vegan ingredients don’t need to be refrigerated.

In its most recent departmental plan, Correctional Service Canada says it provides nutrition “sufficient in quality and quantity” and in line with the Canada Food Guide.

Anderson says the newly retooled food guide put less of an emphasis on eating meat and dairy, instead suggesting more plant-based proteins in Canadians’ diets.

Her letter also points out a UN climate panel report calling for a dietary shift to help combat climate change — another interest for the actress who backed the Greens and their leader Elizabeth May in the just-concluded federal election.

Four years ago, Anderson travelled to Arizona to serve vegetarian meals to the approximately 8,000 inmates at the Maricopa County Jail alongside Joe Arpaio, the controversial local sheriff who made the decision. Arpaio estimated the move would save US$100,000 a year.

Anderson says the jail reduced costs by $273,000 when it switched to vegetarian meals, although reported savings vary widely.

She says the savings could be even higher for Canada’s almost 40,000 inmates — a number that includes inmates in provincial jails, which fall outside federal jurisdiction.

A report in May from Statistics Canada said that in the fiscal year 2017-18, there were on average 24,657 adult inmates in provincial or territorial jails, while the federal portion was 14,129.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 31, 2019.

Read more: http://pamanderson.proboards.com/thread/9236/trudeau-serve-inmates#ixzz643jN7orM

Pamela Anderson opens up about Julian Assange & veganism

Actress Pamela Anderson, who now lives in France with her soccer player boyfriend, Adil Rami, made a trip west to California for the recent opening of the “Pamela Anderson by David Yarrow” exhibition at Maddox Gallery Los Angeles in West Hollywood. (The exhibition closes this week.)

The former “Baywatch” star also makes a cameo in son Brandon Thomas Lee’s reality series, MTV’s “The Hills: New Beginnings,” which premieres Monday night.

During a chat this month, Anderson, 51, shared her thoughts about her activist work, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and the vegan lifestyle pieces she’s producing. Here’s an excerpt from the conversation.

What’s it like to be back in Los Angeles?

I’m not a big L.A. fan. I’m more a Malibu girl. You can be in Malibu and never see L.A. I love being at the beach. Even in France, I feel the same way about Paris. I prefer Cassis. I need to have one foot in the water — or I feel claustrophobic.
Your series “Baywatch” was made in Malibu. When you’re in town, what memories from the series come to mind?

I see my tower every time I go home — Tower 14, the same one from the series!
How did you get involved with photographer David Yarrow for this exhibition?

I love that he shoots animals in their natural habitats. I was a fan of his for years when he worked with Cindy Crawford and raised a lot of money for charity. He asked me to shoot a photo for him, and all the proceeds will go to my foundation. How could I say no?

Your foundation has been around for 20 years. What are some of your achievements as an activist? What have you been working on recently?

We’ve created animal welfare laws where there were none in many countries. I’ve noticed that when I speak with world leaders, things get done. Even [Russian President Vladimir] Putin stopped importing seal products, so that pretty much stopped the Canadian seal hunt. And so many things that I’ve done with PETA.

Lately, I have been working with my friends in Germany [on] DiEM25, which is a green political movement. We’re trying to get some seats in the European Parliament. I have been speaking at universities. I love to see the emerging of young, really forward-thinking people that are trying to change the E.U. and create democracy in Europe.

Everything is incredibly crazy right now. It’s a very strange world we’re living in. This is why I’ve created a new offshoot of my foundation called Tenure, [based on the principles of an academic tenure,] where I take 10 activists and pay their salaries for a year. Because people that are activists … will care about everything. They don’t just care about one little thing. Animal activists like Paul Watson, for instance — even if the sea dried up, he would fight for something else. So I want to encourage people to be career activists.

Even though activists are getting a bad name and certain governments are afraid of them and investigative journalism, we have to really support the people that are sticking their necks out.

The money that I raise will go to activists risking their lives — anywhere from freedom of speech to people on a boat saving the whales, like Sea Shepherd. I love people that are in the mix. They are not just talking about it, they are warriors. I’m really good at giving money to people who can make an entire initiative out of 5,000 euros/dollars. I also sponsor a lot of first responders.

There are so many things in France I’m doing against animals and circuses. … I have a campaign coming out about anti-Marineland and anti-Sea World, so people [won’t] go to these places.
Do you find it difficult to be taken seriously in your activist efforts because people associate you with your background as an actress?

Even other activists tell me to ‘Be careful. Don’t wear that. Don’t do this because they need it to be taken seriously, and people need to listen to what you’re saying.’ And I say, ‘No, I am who I am.’ Sorry. I don’t want to apologize every day or have to explain to people that I can form a full sentence or give my track record.

But I also get into places where it’s unexpected. I reach an audience that’s important. I have a lot of friends who are intellectuals, but they are preaching to the choir. Whereas, I feel like I need to simplify things and can share the same message but in more of a fun way. Because sometimes activists can be annoying! It’s sexy being an activist and it’s a romantic struggle. I like to encourage people to be engaged in the world.

You have been working to get WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange out of jail. What will that take?

A lot of public support. We really have to get him out of jail. He can’t be extradited to America. They are doing everything they can to destroy his reputation, so people don’t support him. If you see people throughout history, that’s what they do.

Keeping him in the public eye is really important, so he doesn’t get killed. But being alive and in prison — Belmarsh prison is not an easy life — he’s never committed a violent act in his life. He’s very calm, very centered. I really encourage people to look at some of his speeches and the things he talks about. He’s very, very smart and very passionate about justice.

And he’s going to keep doing what he’s doing. He knew he was going to be in danger. Julian told me everything that happened and what was going to happen. It was just a matter of time. So now he needs public outcry — and especially from journalists. It’s crazy the brainwashing that’s gone on and the egos involved. We have to get him out of there for sure.

What are your thoughts on the #MeToo movement and how it has evolved?

There’s good things about it, but as I always say, ‘Action is stronger than a hashtag.” Feminism, for 50 years, gave us a voice. … We’re allowed to be able to talk about the abuse in our lives and we have to take action in the moment. We also have to be careful about destroying lives, like Julian, for instance. I have two boys, so I’m always worried about paralyzing them too.

We still want them to be men, to be chivalrous. We don’t want to be too crazy. This third-wave feminism, I’m not really a fan of that, but I am a feminist. I believe in all the good things that feminism has. But I am going to write a fourth book called ‘Saving Feminism From Feminists.’ I’m working on it.

You’re vegan, right?

Yes, we all have to evolve our habits. You just have to. I think it’s best for the environment. I was vegan for compassionate reasons and then I realized the health benefits. Obviously, it’s all connected to the environment and water and poverty and world hunger. There are so many good things about it. You’re really making a statement if you’re vegan.
Are you going to produce more vegan shoewear?

I’m doing another line. I’m actually opening in Galerie Lafayette doing vegan bags, vegan shoes, vegan Champagne and all sorts of vegan products — mostly with small groups because I want to encourage them as artists as well.

The artists are the freedom fighters of the world. That’s why I love to do it. If I have to do a fundraiser, I’d rather be with artists. They are more courageous when they are supporting an activist like me because I have a lot of friends who are, maybe, a little bit controversial.

source: LA Times

Read more: http://pamanderson.proboards.com/thread/9204/julian-assange-veganism#ixzz5rrgUEr00

Pamela Anderson on never wearing leather again: ‘I call myself a naughty vegan’

I decided to become vegetarian when I was a child. My father was a hunter and one day I found a dead deer, without its head, hanging outside our home, dripping blood into a bucket. I cried for days. It wasn’t hard for me to give up something so cruel. I got my father to stop hunting, too.

I call myself a naughty vegan. I live in France, I eat croissants. I do the best I can, but I’m not a dictator. It’s a radical choice to be vegan, so I’m not so strict. Stella McCartney and Paul and Linda created Meatless Mondays, so even if you don’t eat meat on Mondays, you are still doing something good. If you’re Canadian, like me, and grew up in the coastal areas, sometimes you think if you’re vegetarian, you can still eat fish.

You learn as you go along; you make changes. I once promoted a fur line in Russia, where the market is very real because of the weather. And Barb Wire was all leather – I just didn’t think of it at the time. Today I wouldn’t wear fur, and I don’t want to glamorise it by wearing faux, but it’s still better than wearing someone’s else’s skin. I sent faux fur coats to Melania Trump and Kim Kardashian, and both have sworn off fur since. On my sons’ modelling contracts now, it says no fur. They’re both vegan, too, but I never forced it on them.

I started with animals and moved to environmental causes with Vivienne Westwood. She and I are kindred spirits, and I’ve learned so much from her. Her message is more in-depth than the hashtag movement; you have to go further than that – we can control what we wear, what we eat. Fashion has so many new fabrics, recycled from the pollution in the ocean. You just have to be engaged with the world.

As for thinking you’ve done something because you’ve worn a slogan T-shirt or used a hashtag? You still have to take action. I’ve written to governments, delivered a petition to stop bullfighting and protested about foie gras in front of the French government.

I never thought I’d be a style icon. Early on in my career I wasn’t really a fan of clothes. I never thought much about the red swimsuit I wore on Baywatch. It was a beach show and I thought everyone was watching it for the message – it was sweet! I don’t think any of us was trying to act sexy. Maybe the producers had that in mind, but we weren’t thinking about it.

How I dress now is how I’ve always wanted to: in feminine, simple clothing, nothing hard-edged. I don’t like black; I love colours and dresses, and being comfortable. There was a time in my life when everyone was doing everything for me – even my husbands were dressing me. I don’t know where I am in my career. I was going to say I’m glad I’m at the end of it, so I don’t have to be in front of the camera for too much longer. But for the first time in my life I don’t have an army of people making decisions for me. I can finally decide for myself.

Source: theguardian.com

Read more: http://pamanderson.proboards.com/thread/9121/never-wearing-leather#ixzz5Rk7asqf3

Post Archive:

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3