Tag: Interview

Pamela Anderson returns home to enjoy ‘peace and solitude’ of B.C.

Pamela Anderson is among the most famous British Columbians of all time.

After years in Malibu, Marseille, and travelling the world, Anderson has returned home to the Vancouver Island town of Ladysmith, and says her best work is “yet to come”.

Anderson granted Black Press an exclusive interview to discuss how she’s enjoying her time back in Ladysmith, what she’s been doing since coming back, and what her plans are for the future.

As stated in your recent letter to PM Justin Trudeau, you’re a “citizen of the world.” As a citizen of the world, you could live anywhere, so what brings you back to live in Ladysmith?

Ladysmith is where I was born and raised — I always knew I’d come home — after a million offers to develop my property, ARCADY, I’m glad I stood firm and waited. I’m so relieved to have traveled the world to make it back in one piece and enjoy the solitude and peacefulness of this unique town.

It warmed my heart to see Plantitude, a vegan restaurant on 1st Avenue. I think Ladysmith is on the verge of something exciting. It has an energy here. It’s fun, and sexy — everyone I know here has always been a bit naughty and tough. It has an edge.

Nanaimo really has an edge too. Let’s hope we can work together to help people that need help.

We can work together as a community to make it safer and invest in ways to survive better than on the street or in homeless shelters. Addiction does not discriminate — it is a lifelong battle — it’s everywhere not just here. But my heart aches – I hope I can help in this area. I’ve seen a lot in the entertainment world. Putting people in jail and making drugs illegal isn’t the answer. We have to think of ourselves enough to get the help we need. Make better choices for our families and extended families. This is going to take the entire community to come together and heal and find solutions together.

Many people have taken to social media in recent weeks saying that they’ve seen you around town. What have you been up since coming back to Ladysmith?

I felt like the Malibu mascot for years. I’m used to it — I love it here and people will see me around more. I want to inject more resources into the community. And who knows I might open a few businesses. Right now I’ve got a great group of local guys cleaning up my property. We need more help. I’d actually like to give the sober community here some work.

There are some rumours circulating that you plan to develop property here in Ladysmith, are there any truth to those rumours? If so, what kind of development do you have in mind?

Just restoring it for now. And just want a simple dock like it used to be. I’m sure I’ll get a boat one day. It’s been a lifelong art project. My kids have some ideas for “their cabins” / so it’s a family adventure. My mom and dad were married here, my father grew up on the property, and my parents lived with me and my brother in cabin 6, so I’m happy to have not been seduced into building that big condo project.

I’d rather make it more my version of a wild Butchart Gardens with some tree houses. It will take some time. But things are moving fast now that I’ve moved in. Mom and I are painting, and Dad’s still driving the mower — I feel very protected here, like in Malibu and in Marseille — I know about good people. And people become very protective of me. I also know I’m protected by God somehow. Or something spiritual. I’ve had at least nine lives

You recently returned from your trip aboard the Sea Shepherd to protest open net fish farms. Are there other issues on Vancouver Island that you’re planning to protest or lend your support to?

These fish farms have to go. They are polluting and murdering the young salmon trying to migrate — the orcas are starving, and the sea is a ghost town. It has a lot to do with these (foreign-owned) farms. They need to get out of the water. There are 130 on the Island. I won’t stop till they are gone or moved. There is a lot of support and it’s not a secret anymore — though they are well hidden, the ramifications are in our face. Our island and its wild nature is suffering. First Nations people have been trying to warn us for a long time. It’s time to listen.

Once upon a time, you collaborated with Green Party MP Paul Manly on a film. You were also at his re-election campaign kick off. Are there any future collaborations with Manly planned in the future?

Paul Manly is a great activist and he has done so much already with the Green Party. I’ve been a supporter of green parties world wide.

The revolution is now. I will continue to support and collaborate with him. How lucky are we to have him in parliament — we need more Greens to get in there. I think people are getting it finally. Climate crisis is urgent. It’s real and people need to vote with their heart. And then Canada can lead the way.

You’ve been making headlines since you were born as a “centennial baby”, (which sold a lot of copies of the Chronicle at the time). The media has not always been kind to you, and neither have people on social media, how do you deal with media attention?

Thank you for that. I’ve had to learn to not take things too personally. But it’s hard. And being Canadian. I always have assumed people were honest and kind.

That’s not the case. I haven’t grown a thick skin though — I will stay trusting and honest they can’t take that away from me. It’s who I am. I’m not perfect. I’ve led a pretty fun “Canadian style “ life. I think if another girl from here were in my shoes. They would have done things similarly. I’m not a prude and I want to make a difference in the world. Not rocket science. It’s a romantic struggle and activism is sexy.

On the note of media attention, is there anything you’re tired of seeing written about yourself, and is there anything about your work you’d like to see written about more?

I’ve done some things to fund my foundation. Let’s just say if it was anything “reality related” it went to the Pamela Anderson Foundation. It was hard to turn down some of the money I was offered to do these crazy things.

Especially with my friend in jail as a political prisoner that needs plenty of legal help or other vulnerable people in need. It was worth embarrassing myself — dancing, or making an appearance here and there — it all went to things like saving the rainforest, planting trees, first responders. It felt a little gangster.

It’s hard to make sense of it all. I’ve done my best to use me for good.

During your time in Hollywood you connected with many other celebrities. Were any of them aware of Ladysmith? And were you able to convince any of them to come visit?

All my friends want to come here. They are just waiting for my house and cabins to be built. They’ve been watching my Instagram and can’t wait to come. To write, to film, to paddle board, all that.

The boys will be here in October. They miss their Shawnigan days. The best thing (and they agree finally) was to have them here out of the limelight for high school. Now of course they’ve made their own choice to be artists. But when they were young, my job was to protect them.

Out of all your films, television appearances, activism, and other projects, what are some of the things that had the biggest impact on you?

I love to write. I write every day at 5-6am in my cabin looking at the crooked little dock. It’s my inspiration. I write letters to world leaders, in my journal on my website, I write to friends, I write a lot of poetry and short stories. So, I’m a busy girl. And the best is yet to come.

source: vicnews.com

Read more: http://pamanderson.proboards.com/thread/9226/returns-enjoy-solitude#ixzz5xpLUxJD4

Pamela Anderson opens up about Julian Assange & veganism

Actress Pamela Anderson, who now lives in France with her soccer player boyfriend, Adil Rami, made a trip west to California for the recent opening of the “Pamela Anderson by David Yarrow” exhibition at Maddox Gallery Los Angeles in West Hollywood. (The exhibition closes this week.)

The former “Baywatch” star also makes a cameo in son Brandon Thomas Lee’s reality series, MTV’s “The Hills: New Beginnings,” which premieres Monday night.

During a chat this month, Anderson, 51, shared her thoughts about her activist work, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and the vegan lifestyle pieces she’s producing. Here’s an excerpt from the conversation.

What’s it like to be back in Los Angeles?

I’m not a big L.A. fan. I’m more a Malibu girl. You can be in Malibu and never see L.A. I love being at the beach. Even in France, I feel the same way about Paris. I prefer Cassis. I need to have one foot in the water — or I feel claustrophobic.
Your series “Baywatch” was made in Malibu. When you’re in town, what memories from the series come to mind?

I see my tower every time I go home — Tower 14, the same one from the series!
How did you get involved with photographer David Yarrow for this exhibition?

I love that he shoots animals in their natural habitats. I was a fan of his for years when he worked with Cindy Crawford and raised a lot of money for charity. He asked me to shoot a photo for him, and all the proceeds will go to my foundation. How could I say no?

Your foundation has been around for 20 years. What are some of your achievements as an activist? What have you been working on recently?

We’ve created animal welfare laws where there were none in many countries. I’ve noticed that when I speak with world leaders, things get done. Even [Russian President Vladimir] Putin stopped importing seal products, so that pretty much stopped the Canadian seal hunt. And so many things that I’ve done with PETA.

Lately, I have been working with my friends in Germany [on] DiEM25, which is a green political movement. We’re trying to get some seats in the European Parliament. I have been speaking at universities. I love to see the emerging of young, really forward-thinking people that are trying to change the E.U. and create democracy in Europe.

Everything is incredibly crazy right now. It’s a very strange world we’re living in. This is why I’ve created a new offshoot of my foundation called Tenure, [based on the principles of an academic tenure,] where I take 10 activists and pay their salaries for a year. Because people that are activists … will care about everything. They don’t just care about one little thing. Animal activists like Paul Watson, for instance — even if the sea dried up, he would fight for something else. So I want to encourage people to be career activists.

Even though activists are getting a bad name and certain governments are afraid of them and investigative journalism, we have to really support the people that are sticking their necks out.

The money that I raise will go to activists risking their lives — anywhere from freedom of speech to people on a boat saving the whales, like Sea Shepherd. I love people that are in the mix. They are not just talking about it, they are warriors. I’m really good at giving money to people who can make an entire initiative out of 5,000 euros/dollars. I also sponsor a lot of first responders.

There are so many things in France I’m doing against animals and circuses. … I have a campaign coming out about anti-Marineland and anti-Sea World, so people [won’t] go to these places.
Do you find it difficult to be taken seriously in your activist efforts because people associate you with your background as an actress?

Even other activists tell me to ‘Be careful. Don’t wear that. Don’t do this because they need it to be taken seriously, and people need to listen to what you’re saying.’ And I say, ‘No, I am who I am.’ Sorry. I don’t want to apologize every day or have to explain to people that I can form a full sentence or give my track record.

But I also get into places where it’s unexpected. I reach an audience that’s important. I have a lot of friends who are intellectuals, but they are preaching to the choir. Whereas, I feel like I need to simplify things and can share the same message but in more of a fun way. Because sometimes activists can be annoying! It’s sexy being an activist and it’s a romantic struggle. I like to encourage people to be engaged in the world.

You have been working to get WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange out of jail. What will that take?

A lot of public support. We really have to get him out of jail. He can’t be extradited to America. They are doing everything they can to destroy his reputation, so people don’t support him. If you see people throughout history, that’s what they do.

Keeping him in the public eye is really important, so he doesn’t get killed. But being alive and in prison — Belmarsh prison is not an easy life — he’s never committed a violent act in his life. He’s very calm, very centered. I really encourage people to look at some of his speeches and the things he talks about. He’s very, very smart and very passionate about justice.

And he’s going to keep doing what he’s doing. He knew he was going to be in danger. Julian told me everything that happened and what was going to happen. It was just a matter of time. So now he needs public outcry — and especially from journalists. It’s crazy the brainwashing that’s gone on and the egos involved. We have to get him out of there for sure.

What are your thoughts on the #MeToo movement and how it has evolved?

There’s good things about it, but as I always say, ‘Action is stronger than a hashtag.” Feminism, for 50 years, gave us a voice. … We’re allowed to be able to talk about the abuse in our lives and we have to take action in the moment. We also have to be careful about destroying lives, like Julian, for instance. I have two boys, so I’m always worried about paralyzing them too.

We still want them to be men, to be chivalrous. We don’t want to be too crazy. This third-wave feminism, I’m not really a fan of that, but I am a feminist. I believe in all the good things that feminism has. But I am going to write a fourth book called ‘Saving Feminism From Feminists.’ I’m working on it.

You’re vegan, right?

Yes, we all have to evolve our habits. You just have to. I think it’s best for the environment. I was vegan for compassionate reasons and then I realized the health benefits. Obviously, it’s all connected to the environment and water and poverty and world hunger. There are so many good things about it. You’re really making a statement if you’re vegan.
Are you going to produce more vegan shoewear?

I’m doing another line. I’m actually opening in Galerie Lafayette doing vegan bags, vegan shoes, vegan Champagne and all sorts of vegan products — mostly with small groups because I want to encourage them as artists as well.

The artists are the freedom fighters of the world. That’s why I love to do it. If I have to do a fundraiser, I’d rather be with artists. They are more courageous when they are supporting an activist like me because I have a lot of friends who are, maybe, a little bit controversial.

source: LA Times

Read more: http://pamanderson.proboards.com/thread/9204/julian-assange-veganism#ixzz5rrgUEr00

Pamela Anderson on her aversion to ‘anti-ageing’

At 50 years old, Pamela Anderson is still proudly playing poster girl for female sexuality and empowerment, and in partnership with luxury lingerie brand Coco de Mer has released her first collection as its brand ambassador. Designed to flatter the figure (not hard in Anderson’s case), the campaign – shot by famed photographer Rankin – sees the star taking control of the camera in a modern take on 1960s pin-ups.

To celebrate the launch of the 34-piece Pamela Loves Coco de Mer collection, we caught up with the world-famous face to talk about her attitude to ageing, beauty, love and lingerie.

How do you describe your signature beauty look and how did you reach it?

“The ‘just got out of bed’ look, mostly with smudgy black eyes. It happens naturally. I’m not great at washing my make-up off at night. Things usually get carried away before then. I like to start off classy and elegant, but my look evolves behind closed doors.”
What’s your beauty philosophy?

“Have fun and do your best. Always take time for yourself, even five minutes in the morning to feel pretty.”
When do you feel your most beautiful?

“In bed with my love [footballer Adil Rami].”

What are your thoughts on the term ‘anti-ageing’?

“I don’t think it’s a good word. It’s a gimmick to sell things. I prefer ‘without age’ – ‘ne pas avoir d’âge’.”
Do you have any beauty regrets?

“No, not really. Everyone is self-critical. [But] I wouldn’t have done anything differently.”

Have you always worn SPF?

“Never – my parents never put SPF on me. And then I found out how it polluted the ocean [Bazaar recommends biodegradable sunscreens for sea-swimming]. I never wore sunscreen on Baywatch. Just oil.”
What are your tips for doing a classic smoky eye?

“Just don’t be afraid to put it [make-up] on. Then blend away. It gets better throughout the night.”
How do you enhance your iconic brows?

“They are natural. I fill them in with pencil. I have never tattooed my make-up on, or waxed anything.”

Who is your personal beauty icon?

“My mom, my late great auntie Vie and my late grandma Rose. All beautiful, fun loving romantics. They taught me how to set a table. How to prepare myself for love. They were my biggest influences. Strong minded, independent thinkers that loved to be sexy and in love.”
What is your favourite fragrance?

“Coco de Mer Roseravished Oil – I pour it all over me. My boyfriend loves to inhale me… it is our scent, not just mine.”

What are your must-have Coco de Mer products?

“I love it all. Coco de Mer are the perfect combination of sexy and naughty that I like. Blindfolds, toys and lots of body oil – I’m addicted.”
Does wearing quality lingerie make you feel more beautiful?

“I love lingerie and so does my boyfriend. Men appreciate it even more than we think. Tease your man into [getting you] a sexy gift for Christmas – something he wants to see you in. Make it playful and daring for a holiday you’ll never forget. Who knows what tomorrow may bring. Be joyful and take risks, [it’s] the best adrenaline.”

source: harpersbazaar.com

Read more: http://pamanderson.proboards.com/thread/9009/aversion-anti-ageing#ixzz50nU24jDE

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